M8
Automation

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15:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Methodology for Automated Designing of Composite Structures in Suspension Systems
26/10/2021 15:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: M
T. Grünheid, R.Sturm, O. Deißer (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DEU)
T. Grünheid, R.Sturm, O. Deißer (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DEU)
Composite materials in automotive structures have the potential to reduce CO2 emissions by simultaneously saving weight and improving fatigue performance. Further weight reduction potential can be obtained by integrating additional functions into composite structures. Regarding a suspension system, the control arms and coil springs in a McPherson front axle can be substituted by a transverse composite leaf spring. Designing this composite leaf spring structure with wheel controlling functionality is extremely challenging due to the high number of design parameters influencing the geometry and the laminate layer setup. In particular, large deformations due to bending of the control arm during wheel travel while preserving longitudinal and lateral stiffness and strength complicates the finding of solutions. Meta-model-based optimization methods can be used to identify solutions in the complex design space. Therefore, automation in the modelling process is essential. In the Next Generation Car project (NGC) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), new development methods are investigated for automated designing and dimensioning by using optimization algorithms. The programmed process chain is connecting CAD, finite element and multi body simulation software is controlled by optimization software. All obtained displacements are cross-checked with the reference trajectory. The parametric CAD model and layer setup is controlled by meta-model-based optimization software. The resulting geometry is meshed and an implicit finite element model is created to directly identify the structural response. The design space of the optimizer includes different geometric designs of the composite structure and each layer of the laminate which are sized according to the load cases. To ensure elastic deformation, the Tsai-Wu criterion is applied as an optimization constraint. The first results show that the selected optimization approach has a high potential for finding structures which can achieve the desired wheel travel. The investigated process chain creates transverse leaf spring geometries with reasonable layer sequences.
Composite leaf spring ; Meta-model ; Optimization ; Chassis ; Suspension
15:55
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Hundreds of Bolt Simulated With Just a Few Clicks
26/10/2021 15:55 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: M
C. Schlegel (7tech GmbH, AUT)
C. Schlegel (7tech GmbH, AUT)
"Bolts and Rivets often used in large numbers in assemblies to join components together. The chal-lenge is to evaluate these many connections as efficiently and reliably as possible. For this reason, the Fast+More was developed. Fast+More is an ANSYS extension that is easily installed via the ACT console. It is fully integrated into the ANSYS interface and can therefore be learned quickly. The workflow is perfectly tailored to large models, which are one of the application's particular strengths. Here the application example of a all-wheel expedition vehicle with over 340 bolts is shown. For the strength assessment of the vehicle frame of the expedition vehicle it was necessary, among other things, to validate the bolted connections. As is often the case, the aim here was to get a first impression of the design as quickly as possible and to identify the critical bolts and the critical load case. Using Fast+More, over 340 bolts with different dimensions were generated fully automatically in just a few minutes. In other projects, models with well more than 1,000 bolts were also generated. Model class 1 was initially selected. In this case, ""joints"" with fixed degrees of freedom (fixed DOF) are generated in the interface of the holes to connect the components. This has several ad-vantages: the user is spared the often tedious contact definition between the components and thus obtains a solvable model very quickly. Since the model is linear and the evaluation of the bolts against the limit values takes place virtually, bolt parameters such as type, diameter, strength class and many more can also be varied later without the model having to be solved again in ANSYS. ""What If"" studies can thus be carried out very quickly: For example, the question of whether a higher bolt strength grade with its higher preload force provides more safety against slipping can be investigated. Once the critical bolts were identified and modified, we switched to model class 2. This more de-tailed method uses beam elements with full FE prestressing to model the bolts. This allows effects such as bolt (micro-) can be taken into account and evaluated, which leads to load redistributions in the bolt field. Without this effect, the outer screws are usually overloaded according to purely ana-lytical considerations, although they function well in reality. In addition, the bolt load and the resid-ual clamping force are considered more realistically and uncertainties of an analytical evaluation with stress diagrams such as load introduction factor, pressure cone and so on are left out. The results are available for each analysis, for each load case and for each bolt in graphical and tabu-lar form. As shown in Figure 3, a detailed report with the large number of input parameters and calculated results can also be displayed for each bolt. The bolt data can then be transferred to KISSsoft via the software-interface, where a further, de-tailed verification can be performed in accordance with VDI 2230.  "
16:15
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Propeller Design at Pipistrel: A Direct Flight from Simulation to Production
26/10/2021 16:15 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: M
A. Mugnai (Esteco SPA, ITA); R. Lapuh, D. Erzen (Pipistrel, SVN)
A. Mugnai (Esteco SPA, ITA); R. Lapuh, D. Erzen (Pipistrel, SVN)
Pipistrel, an aviation & aerospace company based in Slovenia, has its DNA in designing the next generation aircraft meant to be highly efficient and hybrid-electric. The work was part of the EU funded project MAHEPA (Modular Approach to Hybrid Electric Propulsion Architecture), that had the aim of advancing two variants of a low emission, serial hybrid-electric propulsion architecture to TRL (Technology Readiness Level) 6. The challenge resides in designing a propeller, driven by hybrid-electric propulsion system taking into account the different conditions the aircraft meets during the four flight phases: takeoff, climb, cruise and descent. Considering speed, power and thrust requirements changing during the flight, the objective is to maximize takeoff thrust and recuperation power during descent and minimize power during climb and cruise phase. The propeller design exercise involves three stages: the preliminary propeller optimization, the irfoil optimization, and the final propeller optimization. Within this multi-phase optimization project, modeFRONTIER coupled with CHARM (Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model) and XFOIL were used. With the first propeller optimization, Pipistrel optimized the chord and twist distribution to get the maximum thrust and minimum power for a given set of airfoils. The results were then used as requirements for the airfoil optimization considering a number of specific geometry constraints (thickness, curvature or leading-edge radius), while increasing the lift and reducing the drag. At last, Pipistrel used the optimum airfoil for the final propeller optimization. Within this process thousands of designs were evaluated within a very limited time frame and the overall propeller performance has been increase over 30% with respect to its initial design. The presentation will describe how at Pipistrel the development process of the propeller could be automated reducing significantly the development time while maximizing the thrust during takeoff and not requiring prototypes to confirm the propeller performance.
Aerospace, propeller optimization
16:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Democratization of Simulation Made Easy by “Low Code” Tools
26/10/2021 16:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: M
K. Peters (Crossover Solutions LLC, USA); A. Patil, S.T. Patil (Novus Nexus Pvt Ltd, IND); D. Evans (Novus Nexus, Inc., USA)
K. Peters (Crossover Solutions LLC, USA); A. Patil, S.T. Patil (Novus Nexus Pvt Ltd, IND); D. Evans (Novus Nexus, Inc., USA)
Fast and robust automation to enable accelerated innovation and better product quality. In the face of growing global competition, manufacturers of all industries are required to develop new and improved products as quickly and economically as possible. At the same time, their products and systems are becoming increasingly complex. To meet these challenges, increased and efficient use of virtual tests/simulations in all development phases is a key factor for timely development of competitive products which perform as desired. Automated processes enabling designers to start dependable simulations whenever they need insight on the behavior of their new designs have shown to speed up product development. Unfortunately, usual ways to implement such automation can be exceedingly difficult and time consuming to create or maintain. For instance, commonly used scripting requires to consider future variations of geometry and a deep understanding of how to access and control all SW tools (CAD, simulation) involved. “Low Code” tools make it possible to achieve robust simulation automation, including simulation apps, quickly and easily. For example, the typically difficult automation of "CAD-to-solver" processes becomes straight forward through abstract modeling (AM) technology. AM integrates design and simulation worlds with highest reliability even for the most complex geometries. In addition, AM-automated simulations make it simple to understand and – if necessary – improve a chosen simulation strategy. Complementing abstract modeling-based pre-processing with a low code workflow manager allows efficient creation of end-to-end simulation process automation or simulation applications for flexible use by designers. Ideally, the workflow manager controls all required interactions between the engineering SW tools involved, but also enables flexible capabilities to build application specific user interfaces for parameter input and user feedback. Using structural and CFD simulation examples, this presentation will explain the concept of abstract modeling that enables faster and easier simulation automation. It will also be shown how AM in combination with workflow managers promotes "democratization" of simulation.
Abstract Modelling, CAE Automation, CAD, Democratization of Simulation, Pre-Processing, Simulation, Simulation-Application
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