L9
Multiphysics 4

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17:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Multiphysics Simulation of an Electromagnetic Launcher
26/10/2021 17:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: L
A. Bruetsch (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, USA)
A. Bruetsch (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, USA)
An electromagnetic launcher (EML) is a device that allows for the conversion from large amounts of electrical energy to mechanical kinetic energy. At the Kansas City National Security Campus, an EML is currently in use for the purpose of environmental testing. In order to better facilitate simulations-based testing for the EML, design of a complete 3D Multiphysics model of the EML has been proposed. This will include fully coupled mechanical, electrical and magnetic models. A Multiphysics model would allow for the relationship between voltage input to the launcher and mechanical motion output to be better understood in order to better predict launcher performance using simulation. The ultimate goal is to be able to model these three physics environments that are necessary to produce a 10,000G acceleration within a range between 100 µs and .2 in impulse duration. This would allow us to better understand and tailor the input pulse shape as well as improve the force transmissibility by improving the stator and rotor design. This improved performance would allow for the EML to offer more robust environmental testing capabilities, replacing several existing environmental testing apparatuses. The opportunity for simulations-based testing would also be a significant benefit and allow for time and cost savings by reducing requisite physical testing. In order to complete this model, COMSOL Multiphysics software has been selected after a survey of the many design requirements this project would entail. COMSOL software offers complete two-way coupling of the three separate physics systems using a series of special additional design modules and will allow the end product to function as a standalone executable program capable of computing mechanical output data given user-provided electrical input data. This project has been funded as one of KCNSC’s plant-driven research and development projects (PDRD) and is currently under development with completion projected by Q3 of 2021.
multiphysics, simulation, electromagnetic, launcher
17:55
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Magnetic Latches and Fixtures: A Unique Multiphysics Solution
26/10/2021 17:55 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: L
D. Sarkar, P. Larsen, P. Gottipati (Ansys, USA)
D. Sarkar, P. Larsen, P. Gottipati (Ansys, USA)
Permanent Magnets have become essential components in many household goods ranging from coffee mugs with magnetic lids to consumer electronics like laptops with detachable keyboards or tablets with smart covers that can automatically lock or unlock the tablet. A teardown of a consumer tablet revealed more than ninety magnets – some of them used for the purpose of easily attaching accessories. In recent years, there is a tendency to replace mechanical screws with permanent magnets to attach electronic components. A simple magnetic coupled device has two or more permanent magnets or permanent magnet(s) and ferrite(s) that latch together in a snapping action. Improper placement of magnets or inadequate design of magnets and surrounding components can compromise the structural integrity of the product due to excessive force when the magnets snap together, and a magnetic latch is established. Permanent magnet dimensions, material properties, and air gap between the latching objects are key factors in determining the magnetic force. Therefore, it is desirable to simulate and understand not only the magnetic forces between the permanent magnets but also the impact, this force will have on the structure when the bodies latch together. Even though the problem statement seems straightforward, the complexity of interlinked magnetics and structural changes combined with flexible/rigid body topologies make it a challenging simulation. The two physics viz. electromagnetism (EM forces) and motion (multibody simulation) can be individually studied using a wide variety of techniques via industrial/inhouse analytical/FE based codes however, to couple them together is a difficult endeavor. To study the magnetic latches accurately, a coupled physics approach is necessary. Unlike Fluid-Solid interaction (FSI) which has been studied for several decades, and has been well implemented in various commercial codes, there has been barely any development in coupling the magnetic and multi-body solvers. There are a few commercial solutions available for coupling the magnetic solvers with structural solvers however those are primarily focused on the static structural simulations and fall short on modeling impact behavior which necessitates a multibody solver. Two novel workflows were developed to provide a comprehensive simulation-based workflow for magnetically attached products. One workflow computes the static force between permanent magnets in Ansys Maxwell (EM solver), then generates a response surface in Ansys Twin Builder to interact with a Functional Mockup Unit (FMU) component from Ansys Motion (MBD solver). The second workflow utilizes Ansys Twin Builder to enable a handshake analysis between Ansys Maxwell and the transient solver in Ansys Motion for capturing the movement of the magnets and computing the deformation as well as the structural impact on the bodies when the magnets snap together. Using these techniques, it is possible to simulate the impact between various magnetic, ferromagnetic, and non-magnetic bodies.
Magnetic Latches, Magnet, Magnet Simulation, Ansys Multiphysics, Multphysics, Cosimulation
18:15
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Blood Flow Modeling in Human Aorta: A Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis
26/10/2021 18:15 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: L
D. Patel, D. Panneerselvam (Dassault Systemes, USA); T. Spirka, K. Genc (Synopsys Inc., USA)
D. Patel, D. Panneerselvam (Dassault Systemes, USA); T. Spirka, K. Genc (Synopsys Inc., USA)
Understanding blood flow hemodynamics and the fluid structure interaction (FSI) of blood with arterial walls is important for gaining insight into the fluid mechanics associated with many cardiovascular diseases. In this study, an image based model of the upper thoracic vasculature was created from MRI data using the Simpleware Software. The model was used to test and compare the FSI results predicted when three advanced multiphysics modeling methods; the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) Method, the Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian (CEL) Method and the Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) were used to simulate blood flow in the image based model of the vasculature. Each of the above methods, offers certain advantages in simulating complex FSI. The Lagrangian mesh free SPH method has been found to be useful in cases where there is a need to account for extremely high deformations where traditional methods often fail or are inefficient. When simulating FSI, the advantages of using the CEL method are large scale structural deformations, where the Volume-of-Fluids (VOF) method tracks material boundary in the Eulerian domain. CEL approach is an interaction between the Lagrangian bodies and the materials in the Eulerian mesh. The Eulerian technique is a complement to Lagrangian analysis and acceptable when extreme deformations cause the Lagrangian method to fail. The coupled Lattice-Boltzmann method, being particle-based method tackles many of the drawbacks presented by the traditional CFD methods such as mesh based solutions. In LBM approach, the meshing process is removed as the simulation relies on an automatically generated lattice which is organized in an Octree structure. All simulations were performed in the Abaqus and XFlow CFD software packages. This study assessed the performance and modeling capabilities of each of these methods by comparing the results of each method quantitatively for the predicted velocity field, the predicted wall shear stress and the global flow parameters.
CEL, SPH, FSI
18:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Generic Co-simulation Engine for Coupling Individual Physics Solvers
26/10/2021 18:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: L
K. Samavedam (ANSYS Inc., USA)
K. Samavedam (ANSYS Inc., USA)
Engineers and analysts typically design products using engineering simulation software developed for solving one type of physics problems, although most of the product applications involve multiple physics. There is a growing demand to improve product development processes by creating more realistic Multiphysics simulations. One approach is to use all-encompassing Multiphysics simulation software which can simulate Multiphysics scenarios, but this approach becomes challenging when solving problems with large domain and increasing complexity. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how we use a coupling engine to connect different physics solvers and map the interfaces which interacts between different solvers and transfer the data between them. The challenge with mapping interfaces is that each physics solver requires a unique mesh which is optimized for individual solver and the data transferred is both intensive (Ex. Displacement) and extensive (Ex. Force). To map both types of data between the source and target meshes on the interfaces, profile preserving, and conservation-based algorithms are developed. The profile preserving algorithm generates mapping weights for the target mesh using linear shape and radial basis functions. If there are non-overlapping interface regions, they are mapped by using nearest nodes or by extrapolation. The mapping weights for the conservation-based algorithm are generated by area/volume fraction-based scatter followed by target-side gather. Another challenge with this solver agnostic approach is stabilizing the simulation and reaching convergence. To address stabilization issues with tightly coupled systems, algorithms have been developed for ramping and relaxation of data transfers between the interfaces. Additionally, a python module extension is developed to enable parsing of results from the solvers and dynamically adjust the time step size for transient analyses. For example, adjusting the time step size based on flow courant number and mesh courant numbers have helped to stabilize the simulations. Although coupling multiple independent physics solvers brings different challenges, a highly customizable approach enables the solution of complex Multiphysics systems.
Multiphysics, co-simulation, mapping, expressions, system coupling
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