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08:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Bridging the Gap Between Product and Simulation Data Management. An Analysis of the Needs and Possibilities in Industrial Engineering
26/10/2021 08:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: K
P. Spelten (Fraunhofer SCAI, DEU)
P. Spelten (Fraunhofer SCAI, DEU)
The Digital Twin idea in manufacturing engineering, the virtual representation of the product, promises smooth interaction between the variety of domains involved in the product development process as well as a clear traceability of decisions. To continue the Digital Twin throughout a product’s life-cycle, data standards are needed for the exchange of data and interoperability between different software landscapes of manufacturers and suppliers. While existing standards in CAD and CAE such as STEP AP242 and VMAP allow for smooth transfer of data within the two domains, simulation remains decoupled from the CAD-centred development process. Further development of the standards should therefore be based on the current industrial situation in the industry sectors and working positions concerned with the interaction of CAD and CAE. Thus, exploratory, semi-structured expert interviews were conducted in an industry survey. The results were used to update the perspective on the industrial situations and workflows. Although some attempts for a connection exist, they are presently not well established in industry. The main obstacles for cross-domain standardization are the differences on several layers: 1. Data discretization 2. Demands for processing and storage 3. Metadata 4. Management and workflow structures 5. Software feasibility and usage Additional issues faced by standardization, engineering, and management vary across and within industry groups. The result is a unidirectional data transfer from CAD to CAE, with only non-machine-interpretable 3rd level results being sent back to CAD. Existing commercial solutions are customized, expensive, and not used to their full potential. Therefore, workaround solutions, self-written codes, and Excel-spreadsheets prevail in places, where appropriate standardization might bring the two domains closer together, and slim down as well as speed up industrial workflows. These results imply, that a connection of the domains may be better approached by standardizing and integrating the workflow structures, rather than the model representations.
interoperability, standards, simulation workflows, data management, digital twin
08:55
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
And Yet! The Benefit and Efficiency Gain Through SPDM Can Be Quantified and the ROI is Quickly Achieved
26/10/2021 08:55 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: K
M. Krastel (:em engineering methods AG, DEU)
M. Krastel (:em engineering methods AG, DEU)
The digitization of development processes is advancing at a rapid pace across all industries. Large amounts of relevant data for the product and its development are generated, especially in the simulation areas and on the test benches. Companies are thus faced with the challenge of managing the accumulating data volumes in a structured, secure and traceable manner (for customers and audits) and defining a corresponding IT solution concept. Simulation data management tools (SPDM) are specialized to cope with these requirements and thus establishing a continuous and (as far as possible) automated process chain from model setup, to simulation, and to a reporting of the results. Due to the digitalization of development, the introduction of an SPDM is therefore an absolutely necessary investment – so the theory. But often the investment is not made, why? In the course of the successful implementation of a SPDM in the context of virtual product development, some potential benefits can be raised and the own competitiveness can be secured. In the lecture, a calculation method for determining the potential quantitative benefits will be presented from :em AG's project experience from numerous SPDM implementation projects and substantiated with concrete figures as a calculation basis. Further qualitative benefit effects can be expected in the adjacent areas and will also be presented. They definitely lead to the improvement of competitiveness, fulfillment of customer requirements and thus to an increase in customer satisfaction. It will be shown that the investment in a SPDM has often a short payback period. The successful investment for an SPDM depends on the area of application and the respective initial situation. In order to introduce a SPDM and to select an appropriate tool, the concrete goals should first be defined and the scope for the tool needs to be defined. This becomes crucial for the later project success and the benefit assessment. Workshops are then held with the stakeholders to provide clarity on the roadmap and to jointly work out and quantify the concrete potentials and benefits of the new system. The next step is to involve the user base in the form of key users. Use cases and individual, representative workflows are analyzed and, based on this, the IT architecture and interfaces are defined. This information serves as the basis for a fit/gap analysis with regard to the additional investments required to introduce SPDM. These investments are compared with the expected benefits. In most cases, it will be shown that it is worthwhile to introduce a SPDM supported by the :em AG´s methodology.
SPDM, ROI, Benefit, Use Cases, Model Based Methodology
09:15
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Data Compression for Simulation results
26/10/2021 09:15 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: K
S. Müller, F. Natter, H. Talaat, C-A. Thole, T. Weinert (SIDACT GmbH, DEU)
S. Müller, F. Natter, H. Talaat, C-A. Thole, T. Weinert (SIDACT GmbH, DEU)
Crash, Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are three pillars in Automotive Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). What these areas have in common is that they use numerical simulations to improve an initial design until it meets the specified requirements, and thus justifies the production of a physical prototype. These simulations require, depending on the application area, between a few hours on a multi-core system for NVH simulations, to several days on an HPC in CFD. Assuming a mid single-digit cent amount per core hour, this results in a price of a few euros up to several thousand euros per simulation, without considering the costs for the simulation code. Thus, archiving the simulation result is preferable to re-simulating also in terms of environmental protection. Depending on the field of application, the size of a simulation result varies between a few hundred MB and already reaches the terabyte range, especially in CFD. A proven approach to deal with large amounts of data is compression. Without data compression, for example, today's communication and work from a remote place with video calls and online presentations would be impossible. Lossy compression methods that have been specially developed for audio and video streams, exploit their properties for efficient compression depending on the available bandwidth and the quality required by the user. The outstanding compression rates, while maintaining good quality, can only be achieved by addressing and taking into account the specific characteristics of the data in question. In the present work, we compare different approaches for the compression of simulation results. For this purpose, we model dependencies of data points based on the simulation grid, simulation time and between simulation results. It is shown that the more dependencies are considered, the more effective compression can be implemented. In addition, we specifically address the properties that simulated data contain numerical and modelling errors and therefore the used precision of 32bit or 64bit for simulated post values is window dressing. Hence lossy compression is applicable. Justified by rate-distortion theory, it is possible to achieve higher compression factors by relaxing the requirements on the required precision for reconstruction. Exemplarily, we consider modelling grid dependencies for NVH results, dependencies between time steps for CFD results, and dependencies between simulations for Crash results. Moreover, for these results, we show the relation between the required precision for reconstruction and its compression factor.
Data Compression, Simulation results, NVH, CFD, Crash
09:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
User-Centric Traceability for Simulation-Informed Decisions
26/10/2021 09:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: K
M. Atak, S. Fricke, A. Filimon, L. Reichelt, E. Solana, H-M. Heinkel, M. Brunk, R. Koehler (Robert Bosch GmbH, DEU)
M. Atak, S. Fricke, A. Filimon, L. Reichelt, E. Solana, H-M. Heinkel, M. Brunk, R. Koehler (Robert Bosch GmbH, DEU)
Simulation is a key pillar to master the virtualized product creation technology and thus to harness its typical benefits in improving costs, time to market and quality. Thereby, simulation is not a new, but a well-established method already widely-used within today’s product engineering and release decisions. However, the cost and efficiency potentials can be further exploited by increasing the share of decisions based on credible simulation results. In this context, the introduction of a Simulation Process and Data Management (SPDM) system provides orchestrated and traceable simulation data for the decision-makers to support the judgement of simulation result credibility. The paper presents the results of a user-centric development process (user experience UX) of the data management software and proposes a comprehensive traceability framework. The UX study revealed the pain points of the simulation engineers in data management and confirmed the importance of the usability perceived by all users. Furthermore, the study also shed light on the different needs from different simulation domains. Though, the UX process rendered the traceability as a central pain point which is experienced in all simulation domains. In order to provide a remedy for the traceability demands we present a framework which is capable of addressing all domain specific requirements. In addition to that, the traceability framework also supports the simulation engineers and development teams as well as the decision-makers with an automated and guided documentation of the engineering process. The proposed traceability approach within SPDM follows a credible simulation process and enriches the simulation data by context information using a standardized schema to holistically describe the entire process between the engineering and simulation task and the corresponding decision based on the simulation data. The traceability is demonstrated with a real-world use case allowing the decision-makers to understand the simulation data with respect to the engineering task and hence establishes the fundament for simulation-informed decisions.
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