J14
Simulation for Tomorrow

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17:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
What to do About Global Warming: Modeling the Problem and Solutions
27/10/2021 17:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: J
R. Carson (University of Washington, USA)
R. Carson (University of Washington, USA)
Using 0-D global physics models of global temperature dependence on carbon-dioxide emissions and atmospheric lifetime we demonstrate that eliminating carbon-dioxide emissions is insufficient to prevent exceeding the global warming “tipping point” of 2 degrees Celsius. We examine other means to limit global warming including carbon dioxide sequestration and increasing earth’s albedo. The latter is shown to be potentially much more cost-effective in managing global warming, and its positive effects can be observed immediately.
17:55
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Water Management Simulations for Hydrogen Fuel Cells
27/10/2021 17:55 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: J
W. Seeley (Siemens Digital Industries Software, USA); C. Locci (Siemens Digital Industries Software, DEU)
W. Seeley (Siemens Digital Industries Software, USA); C. Locci (Siemens Digital Industries Software, DEU)
Hydrogen fuel cells optimization is fundamental to improve this technology and make it suitable for heavy duty vehicles. Optimization of the fuel cells spans from modifying bipolar plates geometry, improving fuel cell materials and further developing the surrounding hydrogen and air supply lines. However, one of the most fundamental aspect is the fuel cell water management, tied to the very complex multiphysics phenomena that occur at the core of the cell. In particular, the final water content is the result of the interaction between the multiphase and the electrochemistry. Understanding and simulating such phenomena is thus fundamental for engineers striving to improve fuel cells. The water content of the membrane must be high enough to ensure maximum electrical conductivity and thus optimum "stack performance". Drying out can lead to membrane degradation. On the other hand, if the humidity is too high, the cells are flooded, blocking the air and fuel flows to the catalytic layers and thus also the reactions, which leads to a decrease in efficiency. The water transport physics of fuel cells needs further R&D effort due to its complexity. Numerical modeling can improve the fundamental understanding of the phenomena. In this work a comprehensive 3D model for fuel cells is presented. The PEM fuel cell was modeled in the Siemens Simcenter STAR-CCM +. The anode and cathode GDL are modeled as a porous material, with electrochemical reactions being calculated in an infinitely thin catalyst layer. The membrane is modeled as a solid block, which includes proton and water transport with electroosmotic resistance and ohmic heating. A two-phase approach was used to model the gas mixture and the liquid water transport in the GDL and the canals. In addition, a study on various geometries and water management is to be presented. The geometries represent a sector representing patterns of typical industrial configurations. Water distribution and electric current densities are then compared.
hydrogen; fuel cells; simulations
18:15
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Achieving Rapid Optimization Convergence in Non-Linear Structural Design
27/10/2021 18:15 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: J
J. Pablo Leiva, H. Dong, B. Watson (Vanderplaats R&D DBA OmniQuest, USA)
J. Pablo Leiva, H. Dong, B. Watson (Vanderplaats R&D DBA OmniQuest, USA)
Going green does not mean spending more greenbacks. Ecological has reached and is surpassing economical in priority of design engineering. While tradeoffs have always been an understood aspect of engineering design, the demands on the individual design engineer have transformed many “either-or” considerations into multiple “and” requirements. For example, it is no longer acceptable for a design to be heavy but safe or lighter weight but more expensive. Today’s design engineer is being driven to make every individual part design: better and faster and cheaper and lighter and safer and sooner. Physical structures must be designed to maximize product performance while minimizing the amount of material and resources required to purchase, warehouse, manufacture, distribute service and support the products of today and tomorrow. Also, legacy product sustaining engineering 'same form-fit-function' parts provide opportunity to increase the profitability of aftermarket service and maintenance. This paper details the design system that efficiently performs optimization based on responses computed from multiple Ansys® LS-Dyna® analyses while accounting for linear loading conditions such as those for NVH and Static responses. The design system, OmniQuest- GENESIS® ESLDYNA (ESLDYNA), implements the Equivalent Static Load (ESL) method requiring iterative processing of non-linear structural analysis (Ansys LS-Dyna) and linear structural analysis and optimization (OmniQuest- GENESIS®). Unlike general purpose optimization software packages, ESLDYNA does not require excessive analysis calls even for problems with large numbers of design parameters. Therefore, large-scale optimization techniques (e.g., freeform, topography, topology, topometry, shaping, sizing) are easily accomplished. The GENESIS® setup to perform multiple concurrent optimization analyses using the same base design model is also described for implementing parallel optimizations, each of which implements parallel execution of GENESIS® analysis and optimization within each optimization type. Several examples using different optimization techniques are presented. One example includes optimizing the design for frontal crash, normal modes, and static loading conditions simultaneously.
nonlinear linear EV Electric Vehicle optimization CAE LS-Dyna Ansys Genesis topography topology green
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