H19
Impact Shock & Crash 2

Back to overview

16:05
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Release of Locking Mechanism in Completion Tubing String: A Dynamic Loading Analysis
28/10/2021 16:05 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: H
Z. Zhou (Halliburton Carrollton Technology Center, USA); A. Zhong, M. Macek (Halliburton Energy Services, USA)
Z. Zhou (Halliburton Carrollton Technology Center, USA); A. Zhong, M. Macek (Halliburton Energy Services, USA)
In the oil field, well completion is the process of making a well ready for production. Completion tools are typically placed on a completion tubing string and then lowered into the wellbore. Downhole completion tasks require overpull, slack off, or turns on the tubing string at the rig floor in order to maneuverer these downhole tools. One common task is to overcome locking and locating mechanisms (shear pins, collets, etc.) to release a tool as part of its setting process. The release of locking mechanisms, however, can induce significant sudden movement of the completion tubing string and generate stress waves propagating in the completion tubing string. Consequently, this can potentially lead to undesirable events, such as packer element swab off, premature shear of other neighbouring locking mechanisms, etc. In this paper, a dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) model has been developed to evaluate the impact of dynamic loading on the completion string. The majority of the completion tubing string is modelled by 3D beam elements with cross sectional moment of inertia accurately represented. Specific tool components of interest are explicitly represented by continuum elements. The model is used to analyze the complex physical phenomena such as stress wave propagation, fluid-tubular interaction, fluid drag on pipe, friction between pipe and wellbore, etc. Two case studies are presented. The first case study discusses the impact of shearing of a shear joint by overpull of a completion string before a packer element is set. The second case study discusses the design of a completion string that involves the release of two locking mechanisms in one maneuverer. The two case studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the dynamic FEA model, as well as provide quantitative predictions and mechanistic insights of the high-impact dynamic loading. High-fidelity FEA modelling enables timely quantitative guidelines for oil field operations.
FEA, Dynamics, Stress Wave, Tubing String, Fluid-Structure Interaction, Completion
16:25
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
New Concept of Geometry-Based Finite Element Model Generation for Crash Simulation within the Graph- and Heuristic-Based Topology Optimisation
28/10/2021 16:25 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: H
T. Pohl (Stellantis, DEU); F. Beyer, A. Schumacher (Bergische Universität Wuppertal, DEU)
T. Pohl (Stellantis, DEU); F. Beyer, A. Schumacher (Bergische Universität Wuppertal, DEU)
In today’s engineering processes, optimisation plays a key role in finding good solutions upfront in the concept definition. Especially topology optimisation can drive the design to find new layouts. This is important in the automotive industry these days as new trends as electrification and autonomous driving offer the opportunity to heavily influence the vehicles. For the design of structures, topology optimisation methods are well established for linear elastic loadcases. However, for vehicle structures, a good performance in case of crash events is extremely important and amongst the driving criteria for the concept selection. The extension of the topology optimisation to these highly non-linear loadcases is a fairly recent development. In recent work, the work use of heuristics – i.e. design rules – for the optimisation procedure of 3-D structures has been explored. In order to allow a topological modification, the structure is being represented by a graph description, giving the information about the location of structural members and their connectivity. This graph is turned into a finite element model of the structure. After the simulation run, a number of criteria are evaluated, such as the distribution of the internal energy density or the relative velocity of the deforming members. Based on these, the design rules are activated, e.g. to support a buckling structure with a new member. This new structure is added in the graph description, which then again gives a new finite element model. In order to keep the mass of the structure constant, the thickness of the parts can be varied. In addition to this outer loop, for each structure a shape optimisation is added in an inner loop. Several alternative and competing topological modifications are being evaluated in each iteration, and the best is used for the subsequent iteration. This method has proven to be successful for different loadcases, e.g. to reduce the maximum intrusion of an impactor, or to reduce the maximum acceleration of the structure – which is relevant for the protection of the occupants of a vehicle. One criterion for a reliable optimisation result is the adequate finite element representation of the structure. In addition to the existing tool set, a method is being developed to create a model that contains typical features of vehicle body-in-white sheet metal structures such as flanges and spot weld connections, in addition to more detailed structural joints. A library of members and joints has been created, out of which a new external tool will convert the graph description into an SFE-Concept model. These models can be included in the optimisation loop of the topology optimisation, resulting in more realistic final structures.
Topology Optimisation, Heuristic, FE Model Generation
16:45
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Innovative Restraint Systems – Virtual Verification Respecting the Variety of Human Population
28/10/2021 16:45 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: H
L. Kovar, J. Holeček (Mecas ESI s.r.o, CZE); J. Vychytil, L. Hynčík (University of West Bohemia, CZE)
L. Kovar, J. Holeček (Mecas ESI s.r.o, CZE); J. Vychytil, L. Hynčík (University of West Bohemia, CZE)
It is evident, that today trends in mobility toward autonomous driving systems bring new challenges for both active and passive safety elements. The situation will be even more challenging in the coming years due to the co-existence of automated and non-automated conventional traffic for a relatively long transition period. There are HPC computing used as a standard tool in the development cycle of modern vehicles, but the current certification process involves mainly tests with mechanical dummies, which are usually limited to a single purpose impact assessment. Virtual human body models bridge the gap enabling assessment in multi-directional impact scenarios at least in the development phase. The main aim of this work is to show the potential of application of the virtual human body model Virthuman in crash scenarios, where respecting real variety of the human population is essential. The scalable virtual human body model Virthuman is formed by a virtual skeleton formed as a multi-body structure coupled via a system of springs and dampers modelling soft tissues to outer segments representing skin. The model can be simply adapted to any initial position and it enables fast calculation of injury risk prediction. The Virthuman model is scalable, so it is simply able to represent any human being just based on a few parameters identifying proper representative in the anthropometric database. This contribution describes the methodology of human body scaling and its application to different type of safety applications, where the variety of human population can play a role and it should be considered during safety protective systems design. There will be explained and summarized methodologies, where scalable human model was used for analysis of dangerous scenarios (e. g. like accidents in transportation from perspective of a pedestrian, driver or passenger) or verification of functionality and design improvement of innovative protection systems.
Human model, Virthuman, Multi Body System, MBS, Virthuman
17:05
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Structural Performance Validation of Handheld Consumer Electronic Devices
28/10/2021 17:05 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: H
B. Hurlbut (Dassault Systemes, USA); J. Pawar (Dassault Systemes, IND)
B. Hurlbut (Dassault Systemes, USA); J. Pawar (Dassault Systemes, IND)
Consumer electronic devices are becoming extremely complex, performing a myriad of functions for users. The development of these devices requires evaluation of a variety of components, materials, and geometries within each variant. Using a digital twin of a representative modern Smartphone, we will demonstrate how physics based simulation can be used to accelerate structural performance validation. Potential benefits are improved reliability and customer perception of quality as well as reduced warranty costs. . Use of the digital twin enables simulation driven design earlier in the cycle allowing for the rapid investigation of design alternatives using a DOE (Design of Experiments) approach. This approach results in reduction or elimination of costly and time-consuming physical testing. To ensure the device meets or exceeds functional specifications under a variety of adverse conditions and manufacturing variability, MBSE platform based simulations demonstrating the following workflows are presented. Stresses and forces induced during the manufacturing and assembly processes of the mobile device are evaluated for use in subsequent device simulations. Inclusion of these pre-stresses is essential for accurate simulation of device structural behavior in subsequent simulations. Sealing of the device against the incursion of water is analyzed to ensure compliance with specified IP ratings. The final workflow considered is the drop test simulation, to evaluate the capacity of the device to withstand the shock of dropping in multiple orientations on to a hard surface. In addition to the single drop simulation, results from previous drop simulations can be used as the starting point for further drop simulations accounting for damage accumulation in the device. The digital twin enables efficient collaboration between designers and engineers with a model-based approach. Multidisciplinary simulations are simplified by leveraging the integrated design and simulation platform environment for efficient management of product variants and relationships to simulation models and results. An example of this multidisciplinary collaboration between an antenna and a structural engineer will be included for illustrative purposes.
Consumer devices, Digital Twin, Design of Experiments, Drop Test
×

[TITLE]

[LISTING

[ABSTRACT]

[DATE]

[ROOM]

[KEYWORDS]