G8
Control Systems

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15:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Augmented Virtual Prototyping of an Ultra-high-strength Hot-stamped Steels Process. Real Time Parametric Response in Closed Loop as the Gateway for a Hybrid Twin
26/10/2021 15:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: G
M. Esparcia Arnedo, S. Masqué Barri, (ESI Spain, ESP); M. Lopez Lage, J. Castilla Moreno (GESTAMP Body-in-White R&D, ESP); F. Chinesta (ENSAM, FRA); J.L. Duval (ESI, FRA)
M. Esparcia Arnedo, S. Masqué Barri, (ESI Spain, ESP); M. Lopez Lage, J. Castilla Moreno (GESTAMP Body-in-White R&D, ESP); F. Chinesta (ENSAM, FRA); J.L. Duval (ESI, FRA)
The work presented is devoted to the creation of an Augmented Virtual Prototype of a unique multistage hot-forming process of ultra-high-strength steels developed and patented by using GESTAMP referred to as GES-Multistep®. With the GES-Multistep® process, we may have several forming operations depending on the product shape, in a similar manner than traditional cold stamping transfer process, enhancing to our product design engineer’s freedom for designing much more complex and engineered products than we are doing today. In addition, we may produce sheet metal parts made of Zn coated boron steel, which ensures better corrosion protection also for complex geometries. The objective of the Augmented Virtual Prototype (A-VP) is to predict the GES-Multistep® process for a rapid and controlled cooling in a wide range of press and process conditions in order to obtain high quality parts with no rejections. The first part of the study is devoted to automatic creation of reduced models of the 3D parametric multi-component PAM STAMP virtual prototype consisting of heating, stabilization, forming, trimming and piercing stages. ESI’s non-intrusive sparse-PGD constructor is used to build a parametric transfer function of each operation in a separated representation to address the difficulty of the high dimensionality of complex processes like GES-Multistep®. The second part of the study is devoted to the creation of a “real time” runtime model through the encapsulation of the GES-Multistep® MOR models previously created in a 1D-sysem model in closed loop. Control signal fault models are developed and simulated to improve the reliability and understand the system sensitivity to process fault combinations, identify critical measurement parameters, to define sensors strategy and refined controls. The faulted system simulation data will be used to train the appropriate ML algorithms used for anomaly detection and pattern recognition of physical sensor data. The works developed in this article are the fundamentals for the creation of a Hybrid Twin by combining simulation and incoming sensor data for improved pattern recognition, diagnostics, to ensure the GES-Multistep® best working scenarios and available options for predictive maintenance.
Hybrid Twin, Virtual Prototyping, Press-hardening, MOR, real time, simulation
15:55
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Development of a Digital Twin for Control and Optimization of Potato Peelers
26/10/2021 15:55 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: G
S. Eichenlaub (Pepsi Co, USA)
S. Eichenlaub (Pepsi Co, USA)
In food processing of potato chips, one of the first unit operations is a peeler, which removes peel from the potatoes. The peeler consists of rotating cylindrical abrasive brushes that remove the material from the surface of the potato and an adjustable gate that controls the bed height and residence times of the potatoes in the peeler. When the gate position and brush rpm are controlled manually, process variations in potato type, size, and throughput can cause the system to remove too little peel, which results in a poor-quality product, or over-peel the potatoes, which removes potato flesh (or pulp) reducing productivity. Therefore, automating control of the process to maintain a consistent peel level would improve product quality and productivity. To develop automation of this peeling system, a digital twin of the peeler was created using discrete element method (DEM), and was used in combination with a machine vision system, that measured peel level. In the DEM simulation the potatoes were modeled as ellipsoids with a size distribution determined from the online camera. An equation for the material removal rate (MMR) from the potato was developed, with a dependence on the normal pressure applied to the potato when in contact with the brush and the relative velocity between the potato and the brush. The MRR and the distribution of forces and velocities acting on the potatoes over time were taken from the simulation and used to calculate the amount of peel left on the potato as well as the amount of pulp loss. The simulation was run at different operating conditions using data from the line including throughput, potato size, density, and peel level, and was used to create a surrogate model that could predict peel level and pulp loss in real time. This reduced model equation was used to create a virtual sensor for pulp loss to monitor and validate productivity savings for the system and used to create control algorithms. This study was funded by PepsiCo. The views expressed in this abstract are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of PepsiCo, Inc.
DEM, Digital Twin, Foods Processing,
16:15
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Analyzing the Impact of Different Drive Concepts on Machine Tool Dynamics Using Mechatronic System Simulation
26/10/2021 16:15 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: G
R. Binder (Fill Gesellschaft m.b.H., AUT); M. Wiesauer (Institut für Fertigungstechnik und Photonische Technologien TU Wien, AUT)
R. Binder (Fill Gesellschaft m.b.H., AUT); M. Wiesauer (Institut für Fertigungstechnik und Photonische Technologien TU Wien, AUT)
Machine tools are among the most important components in modern production engineering where cost-effective machining of parts with high geometric accuracy is required. The demand for ever higher productivity and shorter cycle times is met by high jerk, acceleration and velocity of moving feed axes. This rises the need for highly dynamical drive trains with precise position accuracy. Among various existing drive concepts, ball screw spindle, rack and pinion and linear motor drives are most frequently used in machine tools. Each concept has its advantages and disadvantages. Depending on different requirements, such as machining process, operating range and desired trajectory dynamics, a best fitting drive concept for each application exists. A detailed investigation of the different drive concepts regarding the impact on the overall machine tool dynamics requires expensive prototyping and intensive testing. However, mechatronic system simulation offers the possibility to virtually examine different drive concepts in advance, reducing the need for physical test benches. In the present work, the two different drive concepts ball screw spindle and linear motor drive for a milling machine are investigated. The structural mechanics including all physical drive specifications is represented as a finite element model. The control of the drive train axes influences the machine tool behavior and cannot be neglected. Hence, drive trains are modelled in a graphical block diagramming tool leading to a highly accurate and versatile mechatronic system simulation model. Various analysis methods, both in frequency and time domain are available to investigate the overall dynamic behavior of the machine tool. The simulation results are compared to measurements on a real test machining center and show excellent agreement. Thus, different drive concepts can be analyzed and assessed during the development process. Vulnerabilities may be identified and suggestions for improvements can be derived. Furthermore, the system simulation model serves as a digital twin during the entire life cycle for various purposes.
Finite element method (FEM), Machine tool, System simulation, Dynamic analysis, Digital Twin
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