F16
MBSE

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10:40
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Cross-domain Impact Analysis Using the Artifact Model
28/10/2021 10:40 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: F
C. Bühler, . M. Brandstätter, K. Steinkirchner (Prostep AG, DEU); M. Mayer (FOM, DEU)
C. Bühler, . M. Brandstätter, K. Steinkirchner (Prostep AG, DEU); M. Mayer (FOM, DEU)
Model-based Systems Engineering [MBSE01], [MBSE02] supports interdisciplinary development teams in the cross-phase and cross-discipline development of complex technical systems. A descriptive SysML system model used in this process can be extended so that a design calculation of system parameters or the validation of the model by numerical simulations can be performed [NAFEMS18]. Both during the creation of the SysML model and during simulation and validation, various problems repeatedly arise in practice. These are of technical nature e.g., interfaces not fitting together as well as communication problems between the development engineers. For example, the mechanical engineers cannot understand the models of the software team. Understanding of domain-specific models, at least at a certain level of abstraction, is necessary for a common understanding of the system. This effect is called overcoming the "semantic gap" [SEM01], [SEM02]. [NAFEMS18], [PVM19], and [TdSE02] show that the cross-domain understanding problem can be addressed using the Artifact-Model [TdSE01]. In the Artifact-Model, the essential artifacts required for cross-phase and cross-domain system development and their interconnections are explicitly modeled and described. Another application of the Artifact-Model is the cross-domain impact analysis. This publication uses a SysML model of a "Mars Rover" [SMARTSE] and we assume that the stakeholder wants to explore a larger environment in a shorter time as a possible new use case. The original modeling, design/simulation, and validation was done for a maximum velocity of 0.5 m/s. The new maximum velocity of the rover is 1.0 m/s. The Artifact-Model supports the related impact analysis. Since the SysML model is based on the Artifact-Model, it contains all connections between the different artifacts of the system. Thus, the cross-domain impact of the change can be tracked, which allows a reliable decision whether the change should be implemented or not as well as which model components are affected. References: [TdSE01] Dr. Brandstätter, M., Roder, K., „Ein „Artefaktmodell“ zur Verbesserung der Prozessmodellierung“, TdSE 2017 [TdSE02] Haber, V., Hofmann, T., „The collaboration of business and technology: Seeing MBSE with fresh eyes“, EMEASEC/TdSE 2018 [MBSE01] INCOSE, „INCOSE SE Vision 2020“, INCOSE-TP-2004-004-02, Sep. 2007 [MBSE02] „SEBoK“, http://sebokwiki.org/wiki/Model-Based_Systems_Engineering_(MBSE)_(glossary) [NAFEMS18] Brandstätter, M., Bühler, C.: “Using the “Artifact Model“ to model CAE artifacts in the MBSE process”, NAFEMS, in proceeding: “Bessere Produkte mit Modellbasiertem Systems Engineering (MBSE) und CAE”, 2019 [PVM19] Dr. Markus Brandstätter, Veronica Haber, Tamara Hofmann, Kim Steinkirchner, Christian Bühler, „Ganzheitliche (System-)Modellierung mit Hilfe des Artefaktmodells“, Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V., in proceeding „Projektmanagement und Vorgehensmodelle 2019“, 2019 [SEM01] „Content-Based Image Retrieval at the End of the Early Years“, Arnold W. M. Smeulders, Marcel Worring, Simone Santini, Amarnath Gupta, Ramesh Jain, In: IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence. Bd. 22, Nr. 12, 2000, S. 1349–1380, doi:10.1109/34.895972 [SEM02] „Bridging the Semantic Gap with Computational Media Aesthetics“, Chitra Dorai, Svetha Venkatesh: In: IEEE MultiMedia. Bd. 10, Nr. 2, 2003, S. 15–17, doi:10.1109/MMUL.2003.1195157. [SMARTSE] „Smart Systems Engineering (SmartSE)“, https://www.prostep.org/projekte/smart-systems-engineering/ [SYSML01] „SysML Org“, http://www.omgsysml.org/, 2018 [SYSML02] OMG, „ABOUT THE OMG SYSTEM MODELING LANGUAGE SPECIFICATION VERSION 1.5“, https://www.omg.org/spec/SysML/About-SysML/, 2018
Artifact, Artifact-Model, Impact Analysis, MBSE, SysML-System Model, Simulation
11:00
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Integrating Simulation With the MBSE Approach to Increase Product Performances
28/10/2021 11:00 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: F
G. Neveu, P. Grimberg, N. Marguet, J. Daziano (Digital Product Simulation, FRA)
G. Neveu, P. Grimberg, N. Marguet, J. Daziano (Digital Product Simulation, FRA)
In their continuous quest to improve the user experience, many manufacturing companies embed additional software in their products to introduce more intelligence and make them smarter. It is happening in the automotive, nuclear, space, aeronautics and other industries. While this means a significant competitive advantage for these companies, it also comes out with a higher complexity, in terms of design, product architecture or organization. To manage this type of complexity, companies use System Engineering, an interdisciplinary scientific approach aiming at formalizing and understanding the design and validation process of complex systems. Its adoption by the industry is accelerated by the development of MBSE methodologies and tools (model-based system engineering). They offer a way to work with visual representations of the system (model) to be developed rather than traditionally using multiple documents, to avoid interpretations, errors, outdated data… However when it comes to this process is missing a point. It takes little or no account of the simulations, fully part of the design and validation process of complex systems today. With this presentation, we will explain how DPS worked, in collaboration with the IRT (Technical Research Institute), on the development of the braking system of an autonomous electric vehicle (Renault’s Zoe) by a multidisciplinary team. To achieve this, we used and took advantage of the MBSE approach as well as KARREN, a in-house software. KARREN complements MBSE tools in a simple way, with a sober interface and clear concepts. It acts in many ways: • Absorbing and synchronizing the needed data from a MBSE software or simply translating SysML objects. • Creating connections between simulations and system engineering models very easily • Building a robust collaborative space including requirements and characteristic product parameters • Providing indicators to help the decision makers We will demonstrate how associating KARREN and MBSE can make products more efficient and cost-effective.
Simulation, MBSE, complexity
11:20
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Integration of MBSE and Simulation for System Integration, Verification and Validation
28/10/2021 11:20 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: F
S. Kleiner, K. Mai (:em engineering methods AG, DEU)
S. Kleiner, K. Mai (:em engineering methods AG, DEU)
The introduction of Model-based Systems Engineering (MBSE) for the development of mechatronic or even more complex cyber-physical products is key for system synthesis and analysis. In this context main challenges are complexity of system integration, increase of safety requirements or enhanced functionality based on connected integrated (sub-)systems. Besides this, many companies need to change their development focus from component oriented to function oriented development in order to meet technology and commercial goals in future. Today, more and more customers demand the realization of a required function with guaranteed availability and adaption during life cycle including services instead of a specific product. This leads to an increasing importance of a systematic verification and validation process, which can handle the high complexity and correlations of the different domains of today’s products also during operation and life cycle. Companies are asking the question, what added value is offered by the implementation of MBSE with respect to their conventional and established development process. Especially, what benefits will arise with respect to a shortening of the development time, cost savings as well as an increase in productivity, quality including safety and innovation. Based on the system model, domain specific models can be derived and coupled for the system analysis and simulation, based on the interfaces that have been defined inside the system model. Besides the exchange and transfer of interface and structure information between system and simulation models, the system model itself can also be used for verification purposes. Many of today’s system modelling tools allow the execution of models and the integration of simulation into the system model. In addition, direct integration of simulation tools (e.g. SysML Editors and Matlab/Simulink) and the FMI standard plays an increasing role for the exchange between system and simulation model. In addition, the execution of system models (e.g. simulation of activity diagrams or state machines inside the model) provides a lot of additional information with regards to system behaviour analysis and impact analysis based on traceability studies. The presentation will give an overview of the current challenges and benefits while using MBSE for early product verification and validation (V&V). It will be shown how a concept for a holistic system model can support the V&V process, starting from the specification, up to a model-based verification using different dynamic simulation tools. Within this approach, the system model plays a central role and builds the bridge between the specified requirements, the system integration and the system verification. An example from industry will outline the use case and benefits of MBSE and Simulation for System Integration, Verification and Validation.
MBSE, System Simulation, V&V
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