E14
Computational Electromagnetics 2

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17:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Greater System-level Design Insight and Efficiency Achieved With 3D FEM and FDTD Cross-domain Integrated Field Solver Simulation
27/10/2021 17:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: E
X. Tian, J. Wang, Y. Liu, W. Lin, J. Liu, Cadence, United States (Cadence Design Systems, Inc., USA)
X. Tian, J. Wang, Y. Liu, W. Lin, J. Liu, Cadence, United States (Cadence Design Systems, Inc., USA)
A system-level cross-domain electromagnetic (EM) design and analysis simulation flow is presented whereby the Finite-Element-Method (FEM) and Finite-Difference-Time-Domain (FDTD) methodologies integrate to deliver greater design insight and efficiency. For example, a complex structure such as an antenna, a printed circuit board or an IC package is first characterized for its near field EM properties using FEM. Then, the results of which are converted to a time domain planar excitation signals by using Inverse-Fast-Fourier-Transform (IFFT) and integrated by way of electromagnetic equivalent theory into an FDTD simulation of the system for the purpose of delivering the user greater design insight and efficiency. In particular, the FEM results map over into a FDTD simulation as a surface source module that also allows for the inclusion of other/additional large-scale (as defined by its multiple of wavelengths) objects. This cross-domain integrated field solver workflow combines the advantages of both FEM and FDTD methods. It keeps the accuracy and flexibility of FEM to model complex structures while at the same time, employs the memory and computation efficiency of FDTD method to fulfill the large-scale system-level simulation. An integrated environment combining the two solver methodologies seamlessly enables cross-domain usability, capacity, and accuracy. Furthermore, the common environment empowers users with component extraction accuracy of FEM and test-measurement accuracy of FDTD typically required for system-level electromagnetic interferences/compatibility (EMI/EMC) and radiation compliance analysis. To verify the capability of the FEM to FDTD flow, a dipole and patch antenna in free space are simulated and compared with the FEM method. The simulation results show that the presented FEM to FDTD flow could keep the far field frequency domain accuracy very well. Compared with the pure FEM or FDTD simulation, this flow allows user to solve a very large-scale model interacting with models carrying fine details in small parts more efficiently. An antenna mounted on a car simulation is also presented to show the versatility of this integrated field solver.
Cadence, Clarity, 3D EM (electromagnetics), FEM, FDTD, Frequency & Time Domain, Transient Analysis, EMI & EMC.
17:55
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Launching Optimized High-Power Consolidated Millimetre-Wave RF Filters to Space
27/10/2021 17:55 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: E
L. Salman (Ansys Canada Ltd., CAN); S. Acharya (Ansys Inc, USA); D. Liu (Synmatrix Technologies, CAN)
L. Salman (Ansys Canada Ltd., CAN); S. Acharya (Ansys Inc, USA); D. Liu (Synmatrix Technologies, CAN)
With the fact that Satellite Communication (SATCOM) market size is projected to reach $41.33 Billion by 2026, tremendous demand for small satellite utilization in energy, oil & gas, defense, and other industrial sectors is noticeably rising. Satellites are not cheap business and they can cost a lot of money to design, construct, launch and monitor. Well-known factors that drive the cost of satellites are the equipment and materials used to build them. Other factors may be associated with the cost of putting them into orbits. In addition, the growing utilization of these small satellites in the defense sector for applications such as tactical communication, medium resolution imagery, and geospacer/atmospheric research will eventually introduce tremendous opportunities for the satellite communication market share in the forthcoming years. Finally, satellite will play an important role in providing global IoT connectivity as only 10% of earth is covered by terrestrial communications (cellular, Wi-Fi). The number of connected IoT devices worldwide will grow to nearly 125 billion in 2030. The 5th generation (5G) mobile networks promise a revolution in the way we connect. With faster data transfer and the capacity to support a higher density of users, 5G is expected to offer high speed internet, high definition video streaming, efficiency and real time connectivity to IoT enabled devices, thus promising ubiquitous connectivity at three times the speed of 4G. Additionally, mm-wave communication has become one of the most attractive techniques for 5G systems implementation since it has the potential to achieve these requirements and enable multi-Gbps throughputs. With that in mind, the increased demand for building complex RF passive components at microwave and millimeter-wave frequency bands allows to explore the usability of 3D printing technology in the manufacturing process for various applications. This development allowed engineers to re-think the RF design space and explore various unrealizable design characteristics and aspects. It is always challenging to maintain precise mechanical construction of passive RF components with their dimensions held to tight tolerances especially at high frequencies up to 300GHz. Specifically, when we consider the filtering section for RF systems, an early design decision comes from choosing between on-chip, integrated into the RFIC, and off-chip, filtering outside the RFIC with surface mount components or connectorized solutions. In this paper, the design flow of mm-wave waveguide filter assemblies will be studied. Authors will explore different optimization techniques to maintain the design specifications. Various 3D printing experimental work has been done on manufacturing metallic waveguide components for satellite communication. Several additive manufacturing techniques proved to be efficient for reproducing repeatable and low-loss waveguide components at microwave and mm-wave frequencies such as the E- & H-plane waveguide junctions. Moreover, additive manufacturing technologies facilitate the implementation of monolithic waveguide subsystems allowing the integration of multiple RF functionalities in a single mechanical part. This advantageous manufacturing capability enabled the exploration of unique and optimized RF design characterization as well as assembly consolidation.
High Power, RF passive components, filters, multipaction breakdown, satellite communication, manufacturing process.
18:15
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Crosstalk Measurement Between Antenna Arrays Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM)
27/10/2021 18:15 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: E
U. Tariq, D. Macfarlane, H.Shahoei (Southern Methodist University, USA)
U. Tariq, D. Macfarlane, H.Shahoei (Southern Methodist University, USA)
We describe a method to determine the crosstalk between two adjacent transmitter and receiver antennas using ANSYS High frequency simulation software (HFSS) and ANSYS circuit. The antennas used, emit waves carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). However, the method can be generalized for other antennas. The OAM antenna consists of a circular array of eight rectangular patch antennas. The input signal is split into 8 to feed each of the patches. To generate an OAM wave, the signal to each patch is phase shifted by 45 degrees from the adjacent patch, increasing in the anti-clockwise direction for mode +1, and in the clockwise direction for mode -1. The experimental setup consists of adjacent transmitter and receiver OAM antennas. To determine the decrease in crosstalk due to OAM modes, crosstalk S12 is measured between the two antennas with receiver mode varied between -1 and +1, and transmitter mode fixed at +1. The difference in crosstalk is calculated to determine ΔS12, for varying distances. In HFSS, each patch is fed by a lumped port, and the excitation voltage is to be increased by 45 degrees across the array in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction. This is not possible in HFSS, in the case of the receiver, so ANSYS circuit is employed. The HFSS project consisting of two adjacent patch arrays is embedded in ANSYS circuit as a subcircuit model to create a dynamic link. An input signal is split into 8 using a 1 to 8 divider to provide excitation to the transmitter pins, via phase shifters. The phase shifts are sequentially incremented by 45 degrees. Similarly, receiver pins are connected to phase shifters and then combined using an 8 to 1 combiner which is connected to an output port. Therefore, the crosstalk between the transmitter and receiver ports can be determined in ANSYS circuit.
Orbital angular momentum (OAM), patch arrays, crosstalk, HFSS
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