D10
Aerospace

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08:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Boosting Weight Saving for New Generation of Aircrafts: A New Framework for Composite Structures Connecting Design Tools (CAD), Sizing Tools (CAE/FE) and Manufacturing Process Simulations (CAM)
27/10/2021 08:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: D
A. Chiappini (Stelia Aerospace Toulouse, FRA); M. Daubeu (ALTRAN, FRA)
A. Chiappini (Stelia Aerospace Toulouse, FRA); M. Daubeu (ALTRAN, FRA)
In the last 40 years composite materials usage in aircraft structure increased allowing to reduce weight significantly. The maturity level attained from composite (but also metallic) technologies actually limits the potential of weight saving for the next generation of aircrafts. Aerostructures represent 52% of the aircraft weight and contribute for 20%-25% to the CO2 emissions. Breakthroughs in aircraft shapes, composite manufacturing technologies and design and sizing tools are mandatory to explore new ways to save weight and increase performance. STELIA Aerospace activities try to improve composite methods and tools in order to get more optimized and less conservative structures. Actually the reduced time involved in the development of structures and the lack of a direct connection between the design/sizing methods and tools and the manufacturing processes limit the potential of weight saving could be attained. The purpose of the activity presented in this work is to assure the set-up of a virtual chain between the design and the Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) manufacturing tools in an industrial environment combining optimization algorithms, surrogates, manufacturing process simulations and complex failure models analysis. Building a framework where the design tools (CAD), sizing tools (CAE/FE) and manufacturing process simulations (CAM) are connected allows to manage upstream in the aerostructure development cycle the definition of a large number of design configurations, fastly estimating the manufacturing feasibility and sizing the real component as manufactured including effect of defects. The approach presented in this work enlarge the design space of composite solutions parametrically and/or topologically optimizing both conventional and nonconventional concepts; design rules, manufacturing technology limitations and methods for certification are included in preliminary sizing using appropriate surrogates; early production of not appropriate and costly demonstrators causing strict design rules and engineering requirements for manufacturing is avoided sizing structures as-manufactured, predicting defect appearance and optimizing defects distribution.
Weight Saving, Composite Structure, CAD, CAE, CAM, AFP, Surrogate, Optimization
08:55
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
An Automated Silhouette-based Segmentation and Semi-parametric Geometry Reconstruction of Quasi-axisymmetric Aero Engine Structures
27/10/2021 08:55 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: D
B. Spieß, K. Höschler (BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, DEU); M. Fanter (Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd. & Co KG, DEU)
B. Spieß, K. Höschler (BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, DEU); M. Fanter (Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd. & Co KG, DEU)
Simulation models are laying the fundamentals for understanding system characteristics, predicting real components behaviour and thus design improvements. For this purpose, adequate simulation models have to be developed which are commonly derived from geometry, e.g. CAD, parts. Design studies as sensitivity studies using parametric geometry models can significantly support the building of model and assembly understanding. Knowledge about the influence of specific substructures on the component behaviour is decisive especially in early design phases and besides of interest for model simplifications. The desire for simplifications in order to reduce computational simulation effort is still present even in times of increasing computational resources. However, CAD model structure can differ between application cases and does not inherit a parametric set-up in most of the cases due to the implied significant effort. This in turn depicts an obstacle for previously mentioned design studies of various types. For this reason, the presented work describes an approach to automatically rebuild quasi-axisymmetric geometries in form of a hierarchical feature-based and semi-parametric CAD model. To achieve this goal, silhouette information is used for accessing geometric properties. Methods combine three dimensional information with the approximated two dimensional data. Further algorithms map the cross-section to CAD entities to increase its accuracy. This cross-section in turn supports the segmentation of the geometry model. The resulting segmented substructures and intersections are analysed in detail and grouped using the gathered geometry information. On the basis of this information, the model can be rebuild using common CAD features associated with introduced parameters, serving as digital interface for external accessibility. This semi-parametrized model can serve as starting point for fundamental design sensitivity studies, offer substructure information for FE transfer purposes and can be the basis for an automated full-parametrized geometry approach. With the presented automated approach, the manual effort for building a feature-based model, for implementing major parameter and also for simplifying a geometry is reduced while it paves the way for further opportunities regarding automated product development.
Decomposition, Geometry Analysis, Parametrification, Automation
09:15
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Autonomous Urban Air Mobility: an Accurate Digital Twin of the Aircraft and its Environment
27/10/2021 09:15 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: D
Y. Lemmens (Siemens Digital Industries Software, BEL)
Y. Lemmens (Siemens Digital Industries Software, BEL)
The introduction of autonomous urban air mobility vehicles is expected to revolutionize urban mobility. To ensure the safe operation of these autonomous vehicles, the flight management system needs to be validated for as many flight scenarios and operational conditions as possible. Therefore, a digital twin is invaluable as part of an efficient development process that ensures a safe product. This must include simulation models of the aircraft and the environment to develop and validate the flight management system. This study evaluated a simulation framework for its ability to support the development of automated flight management systems in an integrated manner. The framework comprises 3 coupled software packages which perform time-domain simulations. First, Siemens Simcenter Amesim® is used for modelling the flight dynamics together with propulsion systems and the navigation control loops. Second, Simcenter Prescan® models an urban environment and exteroceptive sensors that detect features in the environment (e.g. camera, lidar). Finally, Simulink® is used to connect both Amesim and Prescan. The approach is demonstrated in a case study of an all-electric, four-seater, octocopter with a maximum take of weight of 2200kg. The simulation framework was used to simulate multiple collision scenarios of the eVTOL aircraft with a tower crane in different orientations on the planned flight path to assess the obstacle detection and evasion functions. The results showed that different evasion trajectories are used depending on the orientation of the crane. Moreover, the results also show the aircraft acceleration levels that can be used for the structural assessment of the aircraft and for the assessment of the comfort level of the occupancies during the object evasion maneuvers. Hence, it is can be concluded that the simulation framework includes all required capabilities in an easy-to-use environment to support the development and validation of automated flight functions of autonomous urban air mobility vehicles. This work will be extended in the future with human body motion simulations of the passengers. Moreover, this use case will be extended with the prediction of fly-over noise.
autonomous, digital twin, urban air mobility, eVOTL
09:35
conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Multidisciplinary Optimisation of Steered-fibre Composite Wings
27/10/2021 09:35 conference time (CEST, Berlin)
Room: D
O. Stodieck (Daptablade Ltd, GBR)
O. Stodieck (Daptablade Ltd, GBR)
The target of the 20 months ATI funded MASCoTS R&D project is to develop an end-to-end digital thread for the design, analysis and manufacturing of curved fibre composites for aerospace applications. The project started in September 2020 and it is a collaboration between iCOMAT, MSC Software, DaptaBlade and TWI. DaptaBlade’s expertise in the project is focussed on the design of composite components using multi-physics and coupled disciplinary simulations for the purpose of aeroelastic tailoring of flexible wing structures. By designing wings with flexibility in mind right from the start, the wing shape can be tailored for different flight conditions. The weight and drag can be reduced and the external loads can be controlled, resulting in structural efficiency gains and overall improved aircraft performance [1]. The use of steered fibre composites increases the design space available for aeroelastic tailoring [2]. One novel material technology which promises improvements is Rapid Tow Shearing (RTS) which has been developed by iCOMAT in Bristol. RTS promises to rival the speed of Automatic Tape Laying (ATL) but without the material wrinkling and gaps that occur when steering tapes. It also can lay material around tight radii, which makes the RTS technology particularly interesting for smaller or reduced scale components. This paper will provide an update on the project outcomes so far, focussing on the development of a toolbox for the design, analysis and optimisation of RTS composite parts; and it's application to the design of a reduced-scale wingbox demonstrator. The aeroelastic design workflow, which requires the coupling of the structures and aero loads models, will be described. Typical design objectives and constraints, including manufacturing constraints will be discussed. It will be shown that the multidisciplinary analysis workflow can be automated using a formal design optimisation approach, which allows for faster design iterations and improved product performance. [1] - M. H. Shirk, T. J. Hertz and T. A. Weisshaar, “Aeroelastic tailoring - Theory, practice, and promise”, J. Aircraft, 1986 [23/1], pp. 6-18, doi:10.2514/3.45260 [2] - O. Stodieck, J.E. Cooper, P. Weaver, P. Kealy, “Aeroelastic Tailoring of a Representative Wing-Box Using Tow-Steered Composites”, AIAA Journal, 2017 [55], pp. 1425-1439, doi:10.2514/1.J055364
Composites Manufacturing, Automation and Optimisation, Multidisciplinary Analysis, Digital Twin
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